What is Dual Diagnosis Treatment?

What is Dual Diagnosis Treatment?

Many individuals who suffer from alcohol or drug addiction also suffer from a co-occurring mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD. This phenomenon is called a dual diagnosis. For individuals who suffer from substance use disorder and a co-occurring mental illness, dual diagnosis treatment is essential.

What is dual diagnosis treatment?

What Is Dual Diagnosis: Explained 

Dual diagnosis occurs whenever an individual suffers from both a mental disorder and a drug or alcohol problem. Dual diagnosis treatment involves treating the co-occurring illnesses alongside one another to help the person heal from all fronts. The goal of this treatment is holistic recovery and care. 

What Illnesses Often Co-Occur Alongside Addiction? 

Individuals who suffer from drug and alcohol addiction are often diagnosed with a co-occurring disorder. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 9.2 million adults have a co-occurring disorder in the United States. Some of these co-occurring disorders can include:

  • Anxiety 
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 
  • Bipolar disorder 
  • Conduct disorders 
  • Major depressive disorder 
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder 
  • Schizophrenia 

This is not a comprehensive list of illnesses that may occur alongside addiction, but they are the most common.

The Relationship Between Mental Disorders and Substance Use Disorders

The fact that over 9 million adults suffer from a dual diagnosis may come as a shock to you, but it does not come as a shock to medical professionals. There is a close relationship between mental disorders and substance use disorders.

Individuals who suffer from mental disorders may look to soothe their mental turmoil with substances, resulting in a substance use disorder that requires treatment. Conversely, a substance use disorder may escalate into a mental disorder with continual use and the stress that comes with it.

Additionally, there are common risk factors that contribute to both substance use disorders and mental disorders. For example, stress, trauma, and genetics all impact a person’s susceptibility to both substance use disorders and mental disorders.

How Is Dual Diagnosis Treatment Different From Other Treatments? 

Dual diagnosis treatment builds upon regular addiction treatment, but it is designed specifically for the individual. It provides the individual with medical treatment for all medical diagnoses. As such, the individual will receive medical intervention for the addiction and the co-occurring mental illness.

Dual diagnosis treatment normally begins whenever an individual fills out an intake form at a rehab facility. The intake process involves numerous questions to fully understand the person’s physical and mental state.

From there, the team will work to create a treatment plan specifically for that individual. The treatment begins with a detox. It then continues with behavioral therapies, social support, and sometimes medicines. This approach to a dual diagnosis results in holistic care that warrants optimal success.

Treatment for dual diagnosis typically extends after the initial rehab treatment. Individuals who suffer from a mental disorder will normally begin seeing a doctor regularly to ensure their mental health is maintained. They should also continue therapy or group sessions to target their addiction.

Contact Elysium Healthcare for Help 

Dual diagnosis occurs frequently among individuals who suffer from addiction. If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction and also suffers from a co-occurring illness, dual diagnosis treatment will likely be the most effective option for recovery.

Elysium Healthcare provides comprehensive recovery options for individuals who receive a dual diagnosis. Our programs are designed to help individuals from the inside out. As such, our programs are specialized based on the individual. We even provide a number of facilities to ensure you find a program that is right for your needs and preferences.

To learn more about Elysium Healthcare’s offerings, get in touch with us today.

Is Xanax Addictive?

Is Xanax Addictive?

Xanax is a common medication used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Although Xanax can relieve pain associated with anxiety, it can cause serious problems if used in the long-term. Xanax is highly addictive, and it can cause withdrawal symptoms even after short-term use.

As such, using Xanax comes with several risks. It’s important to talk with your doctor about risk factors if they’re recommending Xanax. If you are not prescribed Xanax, you should never use it because this is prescription medicine abuse that often leads to addiction.

Why Is Xanax So Addictive?

Xanax is the prescription drug known as alprazolam in its generic form. This medication belongs to the class of benzodiazepine, sometimes referred to as benzos. Like other medicines in this class, Xanax is addictive. Why is Xanax so addictive? Xanax is incredibly addictive due to how it affects the body.

Xanax works by calming your central nervous system, which causes it to classify as a central nervous system depressant. It specifically targets neurotransmitters in your brain so that it produces a calming effect. This calming effect is why it is used to treat anxiety and panic.

This calming effect impacts the body in a number of ways. For example, it slows the heart rate and blood pressure, as well as alters body temperature regulation. At the same time, Xanax releases dopamine, which is associated with happiness and pleasure. The sedative qualities, mixed with the release of dopamine are what makes Xanax so addictive.

To make the drug more dangerous, Xanax specifically is unique because it releases small amounts of the medication over a long period of time. For this reason, Xanax creates a longer-lasting effect than other related drugs. Due to these addictive qualities, Xanax addiction often requires inpatient treatment

How Much Xanax Is Addictive?

Dependence on Xanax builds up fast. Induces can become addicted to Xanax in a relatively short amount of time. However, dependence on Xanax requires regular use. On average, individuals can become dependent on Xanax in as little as three to four weeks. For some individuals, this dependence can build quicker or longer.

The reason why dependence varies based on a person is that many factors will impact a person’s susceptibility to addiction. Some factors that will impact a person’s development of dependence on Xanax include:

  • Age when first used 
  • Frequency of use 
  • Length of use 
  • General dosage 
  • Abuse of other drugs 

Let’s look at an example. A person who suffers from severe panic attacks may have Xanax in their medicine cabinet in case of a panic attack. This individual may only take a Xanax when needed, such as every month or so. This individual is unlikely to develop a dependence since they do not use Xanax frequently or for a long period of time.

In contrast, someone else may have a general anxiety disorder and feel the need to take medication for it on a daily basis. This individual is much more likely to become addicted to Xanax because they would be taking the medication consistently over a long period of time.

Signs of Xanax Addiction 

It’s important to know the signs of Xanax addiction if you or a loved one is prescribed the medication. Xanax dependence is typically defined as a person’s tolerance to the medication. If an individual is addicted to Xanax, they will experience withdrawal symptoms upon stopping the drug, such as:

  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Loss of appetite
  • Behavioral changes
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Muscle cramps
  • Irritability
  • Sadness
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Sleep issues

If you or a loved one experiences these symptoms, it may be time for treatment

Get Help from Elysium Healthcare 

Now that you know how and why is Xanax so addictive, you now have the power to begin your road to recovery. Contact Elysium Healthcare if you or a loved one is suffering from Xanax addiction and seeks recovery.

What are the Signs of Opioid Abuse?

What are the Signs of Opioid Abuse?

Causes and risk factors of opioid abuse are varied and complex. Furthermore, the identifying signs of opioid abuse are sometimes subtle and difficult to identify.

Regardless, the first step in any addict’s recovery journey is recognizing that they have the problem. it is impossible to recognize that one has a problem without knowing the signs of opioid abuse first. To learn about the most common signs of opioid abuse, scroll down. 

Opioid Abuse Explained 

Opioids are often used for pain relief and sleep induction. Opiates confound naturally in the form of opium or morphine, but most opiates today are synthetic and derived from these substances. 

Although opiates can be helpful in the medical community, opioids are also highly addictive and create many problems after prolonged use. Prescription medications like hydrocodone and oxycodone all fall into this category, as well as street drugs like heroin.

Opioids are highly addictive for multiple reasons. Firstly, these drugs create a sense of safety and euphoria, as well as relieve pain. These are feelings that some people may become addicted to and compulsively seek out from the substance, especially if they don’t have other ways to work through the pain.

Long-term opioid use can even lead to physical dependence. Whenever an individual uses opioids for a long time, their brain is unable to naturally produce endorphins. Endorphins are the body’s natural response to pain. As a result, the individual is unable to regulate and manage pain as a normal person. 

Once this point is hit, the individual needs the substance to maintain the same sense of happiness and contentment as before. If the addict stops taking the substance, their body will go through a withdrawal process, which involves unpleasant symptoms and feelings. Most addicts will go to great lengths to avoid these feelings. 

Causes and Risk Factors of Opioid Abuse 

The causes and risk factors of opioid abuse are not fully understood. Research has shown that there is a genetic predisposition to opioid addiction. In other words, someone who has a parent who is an addict may be predisposed to addiction.

In addition to genetic factors, there are environmental factors that may increase the risk of opioid abuse. Early childhood trauma, overall trauma, mental disorders, and prolonged stress are all environmental factors that often lead to opioid abuse.

Physical illnesses can also be a risk factor for opioid abuse. Individuals who suffer from severe pain, such as after surgery, are more at risk of opioid abuse. Opioid use may begin innocently as a way to manage the pain, but it may escalate to addiction.

What are the Signs of Opioid Abuse? 

Opioid abuse and addiction come with many symptoms. These symptoms can be broken down into four categories: mood symptoms, physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, and behavioral symptoms.

Mood Symptoms 

  • Depressed mood
  • Lack of motivation
  • Hyperactivity

Physical Symptoms 

  • Weight loss
  • Diarrhea
  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Itchy skin
  • Cramping

Physiological Symptoms 

  • Distorted perception of reality
  • Depression
  • Loss of concentration or interest
  • Mood swings 
  • Extreme behavior changes
  • Confusion or disorientation
  • Anxiety

Behavior Symptoms 

  • Diminished coordination
  • Withdrawn socially
  • Slowed or slurred speech
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Stealing from loved ones and/or other illegal activities

When to Get Help 

If you notice that your loved one is experiencing the symptoms above, as well as an increased tolerance to opioids, it is time to get help. Both physical dependence and psychological addiction require medical intervention through treatment

Call Elysium Healthcare Today! 

Elysium Healthcare provides comprehensive rehabilitative services for individuals who suffer from addiction. If you or a loved one suffers from the symptoms above, call Elysium Healthcare today in order to learn more about our services and to begin the road to recovery.

Common Myths About Drug Addiction

Common Myths About Drug Addiction

Addiction comes with many misconceptions. Anyone who has suffered from an addiction knows this fact. Unfortunately, common myths about drug addiction are not just untrue. They can also be dangerous. 

If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction, it’s important to bust common myths about drug addiction. By debunking these myths, you will better be able to help yourself or your loved one overcome addiction and begin living a life of recovery.

8 Common Myths About Drug Addiction

Although there are many common myths about drug addiction, here are the eight most common:

Myth: Using drugs and alcohol is a choice. 

For centuries, addiction was viewed as a choice and a moral failing. Modern science has proven this myth completely wrong. 

Using drugs and alcohol and becoming addicted is not a choice. Addiction occurs from many factors, including genetics, trauma, and other environmental influences. As such, addiction is a disease, not a choice.

Myth: Addiction deserves punishment. 

Because people of the past believed addiction was a moral failing, they also thought that it deserved punishment.

Since addiction is a disease, it does not warrant punishment. Instead, addiction should be treated as a chronic disease that deserves medical intervention and care, just like any other disease.

Myth: Addiction only affects certain types of people. 

Many individuals believe that addiction only affects certain types of people, often people outside of their own circles. This is simply not true. Addiction does not discriminate, and it affects about one in eight people in the United States.

Myth: People who have a stable job and life cannot be addicted. 

Whenever many individuals think of an addict, they think of a homeless individual who is incapable of keeping their life together. Although some addicts fall into this category, addiction impacts all individuals, including those with stable jobs and successful lives.

This myth has caused many individuals to be in denial about their addiction and reject recovery as a result. Just because an individual waits until 5:00 PM to use does not mean they are not addicted.

Myth: Prescription drugs are not as dangerous as street drugs. 

Prescription drugs are just as addictive as street drugs. As a result, addiction to prescription medication is becoming more and more of a problem. If you are not using a prescribed medicine exactly how the doctor intended, you are misusing the medication. If you need the medicine compulsively, you are addicted. 

Myth: Going to treatment will fix the problem immediately. 

Most people make the mistake of thinking that attending treatment will immediately stop their problems. This is not how addiction works. Addiction is a chronic disease that requires a lifetime of effort and work that begins with treatment

Myth: Using medication during detox is the same as switching from one addiction to another.

The detox process is painful and sometimes dangerous, which warrants medical intervention and medications. 

Using medication during the detox is not the same as switching from one illicit substance to another. These medications not only ensure that your detox is as comfortable as possible, but they can also ensure that you are not harmed during the process and that you continue on your road to recovery.

Myth: Detoxing is enough.

Some individuals think that getting clean is the only step in breaking their addiction. Addiction involves much more than physical dependence. If you do not receive the medical intervention you need to fight the addiction from all fronts after detox, you will likely relapse.

Suffering from Addiction? Call Elysium Healthcare Today! 

If you or a loved one is suffering from drug addiction, contact Elysium Healthcare for a luxurious approach to addiction treatment in California.

What is the Timeline for Opioid Detox?

Timeline for Opioid Detox

Withdrawal occurs whenever you stop taking long-term opioids. Unfortunately, opioid withdrawal is a difficult and dangerous phase during the recovery process. However, it is the first and arguably most important step in beginning your life of sobriety.

The good news is that opioid withdrawal comes in stages, which means you can know what to anticipate. Furthermore, you can detox from opioids in medical scenarios to ensure you are as safe and comfortable as possible.

Signs of Opioid Withdrawal 

Symptoms of opioid withdrawal range from mild to severe. The most common symptoms to expect include:

  • Insomnia
  • Racing heart
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle and bone pain
  • Chills
  • Anxiety
  • Diarrhea
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Increased body temperature

If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms and have stopped using opioids, you are likely experiencing opioid withdrawal.

How Long Does Opioid Withdrawal Last?

How long opioid withdrawal lasts ultimately depends on the opioid in question. Certain opioids have longer withdrawal periods, whereas others have shorter duration symptoms. 

For example, short-acting opioids, such as heroin, often cause withdrawal that lasts for about a week. Long-acting opioids, such as methadone, can have withdrawal symptoms that last up to two weeks or longer. So, it’s important to consider the type of opioid in your system in order to determine how long withdrawal will last.

Opioid Detox Timeline 

To better understand opioid withdrawal, it’s a good idea to consider an opioid detox timeline. Opioid detox typically has three stages: early, peak, and late. When these stages occur depends on the individual in question and the opioid being used. Let’s take a closer look at each one of these stages, including when they occur and the symptoms.

Early Stage 

Individuals will enter into the early stage of opioid withdrawal shortly after the last use of an opioid. You can determine when the early stage will happen using the half-life of the drug. Whenever your body has eliminated half of the drug substance, you will begin craving again, which is the early stage.

Most opioids have a half-life of about a few hours. Oxycodone, for example, has a half-life between 3 and 5 hours. Methadone has a much longer half-life at 8 to 60 hours. Once the half-life has been met, symptoms of early stage opioid withdrawal will begin.

Symptoms of early stage opioid withdrawal include:

  • Cravings 
  • Anxiety 
  • Frustration 
  • Physical changes 

These symptoms will progressively get worse as time goes on.

Peak Stage 

As the opioids continue to leave your body, the symptoms will get worse until they reach the peak stage. The peak stage of opioid withdrawal is whenever symptoms are at their most severe. Most individuals undergo the peak stage between 30 and 72 hours after the last use.

During the peak stage, expect symptoms to be very severe. Some common symptoms include:

  • Flu-like symptoms 
  • Mood changes 
  • Intense cravings 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Vomiting 
  • Constipation 
  • Rapid heart rate 
  • Changes in blood pressure 
  • Feeling hot or cold 
  • Sweating 

These symptoms will be incredibly powerful during the peak, which is why it’s important to get medical care when undergoing detox for these symptoms.

Late Stage 

The late stage occurs after the peak stage. It is whenever the symptoms begin to subside. The late stage reflects the early stage, but you are getting better. Late stage withdrawal typically happens 5 to 10 days after your last use, but the stage may not begin after the 2 week period for long-acting opioids.

Detox Safely with Elysium Healthcare

Opioid withdrawal is incre

Withdrawal occurs whenever you stop taking long-term opioids. Unfortunately, opioid withdrawal is a difficult and dangerous phase during the recovery process. However, it is the first and arguably most important step in beginning your life of sobriety.

The good news is that opioid withdrawal comes in stages, which means you can know what to anticipate. Furthermore, you can detox from opioids in medical scenarios to ensure you are as safe and comfortable as possible.

Signs of Opioid Withdrawal 

Symptoms of opioid withdrawal range from mild to severe. The most common symptoms to expect include:

  • Insomnia
  • Racing heart
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle and bone pain
  • Chills
  • Anxiety
  • Diarrhea
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Increased body temperature

If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms and have stopped using opioids, you are likely experiencing opioid withdrawal.

How Long Does Opioid Withdrawal Last?

How long opioid withdrawal lasts ultimately depends on the opioid in question. Certain opioids have longer withdrawal periods, whereas others have shorter duration symptoms. 

For example, short-acting opioids, such as heroin, often cause withdrawal that lasts for about a week. Long-acting opioids, such as methadone, can have withdrawal symptoms that last up to two weeks or longer. So, it’s important to consider the type of opioid in your system in order to determine how long withdrawal will last.

Opioid Detox Timeline 

To better understand opioid withdrawal, it’s a good idea to consider an opioid detox timeline. Opioid detox typically has three stages: early, peak, and late. When these stages occur depends on the individual in question and the opioid being used. Let’s take a closer look at each one of these stages, including when they occur and the symptoms.

Early Stage 

Individuals will enter into the early stage of opioid withdrawal shortly after the last use of an opioid. You can determine when the early stage will happen using the half-life of the drug. Whenever your body has eliminated half of the drug substance, you will begin craving again, which is the early stage.

Most opioids have a half-life of about a few hours. Oxycodone, for example, has a half-life between 3 and 5 hours. Methadone has a much longer half-life at 8 to 60 hours. Once the half-life has been met, symptoms of early stage opioid withdrawal will begin.

Symptoms of early stage opioid withdrawal include:

  • Cravings 
  • Anxiety 
  • Frustration 
  • Physical changes 

These symptoms will progressively get worse as time goes on.

Peak Stage 

As the opioids continue to leave your body, the symptoms will get worse until they reach the peak stage. The peak stage of opioid withdrawal is whenever symptoms are at their most severe. Most individuals undergo the peak stage between 30 and 72 hours after the last use.

During the peak stage, expect symptoms to be very severe. Some common symptoms include:

  • Flu-like symptoms 
  • Mood changes 
  • Intense cravings 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Vomiting 
  • Constipation 
  • Rapid heart rate 
  • Changes in blood pressure 
  • Feeling hot or cold 
  • Sweating 

These symptoms will be incredibly powerful during the peak, which is why it’s important to get medical care when undergoing detox for these symptoms.

Late Stage 

The late stage occurs after the peak stage. It is whenever the symptoms begin to subside. The late stage reflects the early stage, but you are getting better. Late stage withdrawal typically happens 5 to 10 days after your last use, but the stage may not begin after the 2 week period for long-acting opioids.

Detox Safely with Elysium Healthcare

Opioid withdrawal is incredibly difficult and painful. Not to mention, is sometimes dangerous due to the severity of the symptoms. Make sure today to detox safely with the help of the professionals at Elysium Healthcare. Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our medical detox programs.

dibly difficult and painful. Not to mention, is sometimes dangerous due to the severity of the symptoms. Make sure today to detox safely with the help of the professionals at Elysium Healthcare. Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our medical detox programs.

What is Considered Aftercare in Addiction Treatment?

ftercare in Addiction Treatment

Detoxing or getting clean for the first time is a difficult part of the recovery process. However, most recovering addicts agree that what happens after the initial treatment is much more difficult than the initial treatment itself.

Once you get back to your old life, you have to fight the temptations that caused the addiction in the first place. Without the right resources and tools, you could quickly find yourself slipping back into the same habits as before. That is where aftercare in addiction treatment comes into play.

The goal of addiction treatment aftercare is to provide newly recovered addicts with a treatment plan so that they stay sober, even after leaving the facility. That way, individuals can fight initial relapse and continue meeting their recovery goals.

What Is Aftercare in Addiction Treatment? 

Achieving sobriety for the first time is a huge deal, but addiction doesn’t stop whenever the withdrawals do. Aftercare is essential in maintaining your sober living. Without proper aftercare in addiction treatment, you could find yourself relapsing again.

With aftercare addiction treatment, you’ll receive resources so you can continue living a sober life, even after you leave your initial treatment facility. Individuals who receive aftercare in addiction treatment tend to have lower relapse rates as a result.

What Does Aftercare in Addiction Treatment Entail? 

There are different types of addiction treatment aftercare. It’s important that you select aftercare in addiction treatment that is specific to your needs and lifestyle.

For individuals with severe addiction, you may be recommended to live in a sober living community. Sober living communities ensure you are in a sober environment, but you still have resources and are living your life as normal.

There are less intensive aftercare programs as well. For example, you can attend 12-step or anonymous settings so you can retain your support system, even while going about your everyday life. You could also attend personal or group therapy sessions offered through outpatient services. 

With Elysium Healthcare, our doctors will work closely with you to create an aftercare plan specific to your needs. We offer sober living communities, but we also offer different outpatient therapy sessions so that our patients can continue living sober, even after their initial sobriety has been reached.

Who Needs Aftercare in Addiction Treatment?

Substance abuse disorder is a serious problem in the United States. It is estimated that 10% of the US adult population struggles with this disorder. More worrisome is the fact that as much as 60% of individuals who reach sobriety end up relapsing.

Because the statistics concerning relapse are so staggering, anyone who undergoes addiction treatment should seek aftercare as well. Studies have found that individuals who undergo aftercare in addiction treatment are less likely to relapse in the first place.

What this means for you is that everyone who undergoes addiction treatment needs aftercare. It’s important to talk to your doctor in order to create an aftercare treatment plan that is specific for your lifestyle, needs, and goals.

Stay Sober with Elysium Healthcare 

If you or a loved one has undergone addiction treatment, it’s imperative to also seek out aftercare in addiction treatment. Aftercare can help individuals stay sober after the initial sobriety. In fact, studies show that individuals who undergo aftercare are less likely to relapse than those who do not.Elysium Healthcare offers aftercare in addiction treatment. We offer various aftercare plans, including outpatient services, sober living communities, and other resources. If you are interested in our aftercare programs, contact Elysium Healthcare today. We will be happy to work with you to come up with a plan to help you stay sober.

What is a Relapse Prevention Program?

Relapse Prevention Program

Recognizing that you need help and getting that helped for the first time is only half the battle. After you get the initial treatment you need to begin your life with sobriety, you also have to continue fighting for the new life you have worked hard to create. For many recovering addicts, what happens after they leave the facility is the toughest challenge of all. 

Comprehensive addiction treatment should always include some sort of relapse prevention program. Relapse prevention helps you to stay on the road to sobriety, even after you leave your sober living facilities. Without a relapse prevention program, it can be difficult to continue living soberly after you leave the facility.

The Possibility of Relapse

Many individuals who fight for sobriety believe that they will continue on the right road after returning home. Unfortunately, this is not the case for many addicts. Some studies have suggested that only about 30% of addicts do not relapse after leaving the facility. In other words, the vast majority of addicts relapse after their initial treatment at least once. 

Because the possibility of relapse is so high, it’s always important to be prepared in advance. Even if you believe that relapse will not happen, you always want to have a relapse prevention plan to keep you living the life you’ve worked hard for.

What is a Relapse Prevention Program? 

A relapse prevention program is a program designed to help newly recovered addicts stay sober. Relapse prevention programs are typically tailored to the individual to ensure each person gets the treatment and care they need for their unique situation. Recovering addicts will work c loosely with their doctors to create a plan for them. 

What’s Included in a Relapse Prevention Program? 

Relapse prevention programs include various techniques and methods to help individuals stay on the course of sobriety. Some examples of treatments included in relapse prevention programs include group therapy, individual therapy, and sober living homes.

Sober living homes are typically the first step in relapse prevention. These homes are designed for individuals who have finished their course in residential inpatient care, but still want to live in a sober community. With sober living homes, you will be in a sober environment and find support in other individuals like yourself.

Once you’ve moved out of sober living homes, you can still participate in certain relapse prevention programs, such as therapy or group therapy. The idea behind these programs is to help you have the resources you need to stay sober, even when you are living your normal life again.

Is a Relapse Prevention Program Right For Me?

Relapse prevention programs are right for anyone who has struggled with addiction in the past and is now beginning to live a life of sobriety. In other words, everyone who has fought to have a sober life should get involved in a relapse prevention program.

Even if you feel that you will not be tempted to relapse, it’s still a good idea to enroll in a relapse prevention program. Because the chances of relapse are so high, having a prevention program can ensure you continue living your sober life.

Elysium Healthcare provides relapse prevention programs for individuals who have suffered from addiction in the past but who now want to live a sober life. With our prevention programs, you can continue living sober and get the help you need to avoid falling back into the same habits as before.

If you are interested in learning more about what is a relapse prevention program or if a relapse prevention program is right for you, contact Elysium Healthcare today. Our experienced and compassionate staff are happy to work with you to determine if our sober living homes or relapse prevention programs are right for you.

How to Find the Drug Rehab Facility That is Best for Me?

Your journey to sobriety is going to be a tough one, but it is something that is necessary if you want to live the life you’ve always been striving for. To ensure you have the best recovery process possible, it’s imperative to find a top drug rehab facility that is great for you.

Knowing how to find a drug rehab facility that’s right for you can be difficult, though, especially if you’ve never done so before. The good news is that you are not alone. Below, learn how to find a good drug rehab facility based on your goals and independent factors.

How To Find A Drug Rehab Facility That’s Right For You 

In order to find a drug rehab facility that’s right for you, it’s important that you understand your goals and select a treatment location that is specific to your needs. Here are the three steps you need to take to select a rehab facility that’s ideal for your needs:

Step 1: Decide On Your Goals 

Before you get started researching rehab locations, decide what your rehab goals and needs are. Do you need dual diagnosis treatment? Is your initial goal only to get through detox safely? Knowing your goals beforehand can help you select the best treatment center in order to accomplish these goals.

Step 2: Explore Different Treatment Locations 

Once you know what your goals are, begin exploring different treatment locations. There are treatment locations all around the nation. Specifically, look for locations that can help you accomplish the goals you set from step one.

Step 3: Talk To Treatment Providers 

Once you have a list of locations you are interested in, begin talking to treatment providers. The providers will give you a better feel of the program and help you select a program based on your unique personality.

How To Find A Good Drug Rehab Facility: Factors To Consider 

During the three steps above, there are some independent factors you should consider. These factors will help you to discern a good treatment program from a bad one. Here are the three factors you need to consider during the research phases:

Comprehensive Treatment Options 

Addiction is complex and requires different treatment options. Some comprehensive treatment options to look for include medical detox, inpatient services, outpatient services, relapse prevention programs, and dual diagnosis treatment. Selecting a facility with comprehensive treatment options ensures you will have the resources you need to have a safe and effective recovery.

Specialties 

Some facilities have specific specialties that can ensure you have the most successful recovery possible. For example, there are some LGBTQ facilities, as well as dual diagnosis-specific facilities. Look for facilities that have specialties that match your unique needs.

Amenities 

Lastly, check out the amenities that the facility has, especially if you intend to invest in inpatient services. Amenities include housing, workout facilities, and other activities you can participate in. The amenities will make your stay more enjoyable and more successful.

Get Started On Your Road to Sobriety Today 

To get started on your road to sobriety today, begin looking for a rehab facility that is tailored to your needs. Elysium Healthcare will be happy to walk with you through the entire process. 

Elysium Healthcare is a top rehab facility in California. We provide comprehensive treatment options for many individuals. Whether you need help with medical detox or need help staying in a sober living facility, Elysium Healthcare has options for you. To learn more about Elysium Healthcare and the services we provide, get in touch with us today to speak with a treatment provider confidentially.

Options for Addiction Treatment for Cigna Insurance Policy Holders

Healing the body and mind from addiction is a complex process that might need several forms of treatment. That’s why the costs can go up unexpectedly, and that’s something that many of us don’t want to experience. Thankfully, there are insurance policies that will help ease this financial burden.

As your trusted drug addiction treatment center, Elysium Healthcare offers plenty of options for insurance policyholders. One of the most frequent carriers we encounter is Cigna, one of the biggest healthcare insurance companies in the US. We accept most of their insurance plans so you or your loved one can get the Cigna rehab needed to recover at one of our 5 California facilities. 

Cigna Drug Rehab: Policies for Addiction Treatment

Insurance companies are required by the Affordable Healthcare Act (AHA) to provide some level of coverage for drug rehabilitation or substance abuse treatments. This includes expenses for detoxification, inpatient rehab, residential rehab, and partial hospitalization. Still, the coverage will depend on the type of plan you get. Cigna has several tiers in particular, and these are as follows:

  • Bronze: The Cigna Bronze plan is the most affordable option in terms of monthly premiums. However, you can only claim 60% of medical expenses and you have to pay the other 40% out of pocket.
  • Silver: The price tag for the Cigna Silver Plan is higher than the Bronze Plan, but Cigna will cover 70% of the total expenses while you only pay 30%. 
  • Gold: The second most expensive option is the Cigna Gold Plan. The company will pay 80% of your medical expenses and you pay only 20% out of pocket.
  • Platinum: If you have the means, you can opt for the Cigna Platinum Plan as it offers the most coverage. They will cover 90% of your expenses while you only pay 10% out of pocket.

Out-of-Pocket Payments and Deductibles

Given the numbers above, you still need to consider your deductibles. In insurance, this is a set amount you have to pay before your policy starts to cover the costs. In most plans, your deductible will be lower if your monthly premiums are higher. The same is true vice versa.

It’s important to remember that out-of-pocket payments include all the deductibles, co-pays, and co-insurance payments that you pay outside of your monthly premium. This value has a maximum, and if you’ve reached that amount, all other expenses will be covered by your insurance company.

HMO and PPO: What’s the Difference?

Cigna has other variations of insurance plans compatible with the tiers mentioned. Among these are HMO and PPO plans, two classifications with Bronze to Platinum tiers. There are a few key differences between these two, so read on to learn which option is the best for you.

HMO

HMO stands for Health Maintenance Organization, a network of healthcare providers who provide services for insurance holders and their dependents. An HMO plan gives you access to these doctors, but you’ll need to choose a primary care provider from this network. This option requires lower monthly premiums than PPOs, so it’s a good option for those within a budget.

PPO

The Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) plan is the more expensive option, but this will allow you more flexibility. You can choose a healthcare provider outside of the PPO network without the need for referrals, and you’ll still be covered. This is a good option if you want a recovery or drug addiction specialist who is outside of Cigna’s PPO network.

Cigna Rehab Treatments at 90210 Recovery

At 90210 Cigna, we accept most Cigna policies to cover your or your loved one’s treatment costs. That way, you can rest easy knowing that you’re getting the best programs without endangering your finances. You’ll be well on your way to complete recovery with the help of our addiction specialists, therapists, and counselors. Some of the programs offered include: 

  • Medical Detoxification
  • Residential Inpatient 
  • Family Support
  • Recovery
  • Mental Health Repair
  • Aftercare and Alumni Programs

Why Get Insurance in the First Place?

Some people are hesitant about getting insurance, since it’s something you only benefit from if you’re injured, which everyone avoids as much as possible anyways. However, try as we might, everyone ends up injured at some point. Having an insurance plan is a guaranteed cushion that protects you from huge financial losses when illnesses or injuries happen.

Lower Out-of-Pocket Costs

The most basic reason why people get insurance is to lower the costs of medical procedures and related expenses. This is especially applicable for those with drug addiction or substance abuse problems, since rehabilitation will mean extended stays in a treatment facility.

Access to More High-End Treatment Centers

Depending on the type of plan you get, you’ll have more freedom in choosing the treatment center where you or a loved one will stay. These include ones with more programs or specialists. The costs won’t be much of an issue since your insurance will be covering it.

Investment Opportunities

Part of the premiums you pay become investments after some time. This means that you’ll be earning a certain amount, called dividends. The amount will depend on your monthly payments and it increases proportionally.

Reach Out to Us

For more information about Cigna insurance plans and what treatments are covered, please contact us today. Our team will be on standby to answer your inquiries.