How to Get a Job After Rehab Ends

How to Get a Job After Rehab Ends

Leaving rehab is the beginning of a life-long journey into recovery. At first, it can be challenging for an addict to begin to live a normal life, particularly if they have been off the rails for a long time. Re-entering the workforce or getting a job after rehab can present its own set of challenges.

For example: Going back to an old job could trigger the addict’s old habits, or it could become a source of shame due to previous addictive behaviors in the workplace. On the other hand, not being employed and having a gap on the CV could make it difficult to land at the top of the stack.

The good news is that everything is much easier when you are sober, getting over an addiction is an impressive accomplishment that shouldn’t be understated – The recommendations in this article can help addicts get their careers back on track.

Flipping the Script

  1. This one may not be for everybody, but hear me out – most people will naturally want to hide the details about their recovery from potential employers, and this is absolutely FINE. However, there is a great deal of power behind your story and what you just went through that can be used in your favor. 

It’s true that some employers will be judgmental and discriminatory, but there will also be a large number of them that will see your recovery as something positive.

Why?

  • Strength: Recovery is not a weakness, it’s a strength. Most people are barely able to maintain control over their diet, let alone stop drinking forever. The discipline and strength of an addict in recovery is unmatched. Those are soft skills that are in high demand in the business world, get your bragging rights in order because you deserve them.
  • Courage: Courage is also a high-demand soft skill in the business world. Having the courage to discuss your recovery can demonstrate that you can be a good leader and tackle situations in a level-headed way.
  • Honesty: Most will assume that addicts in recovery would keep their condition a secret, openly speaking about it shows that you are an honest person that can be trusted. Business is based on trust and honest employees are highly sought after.

Choosing the high route is a personal choice, each person must use their best judgment to understand what’s best for the situation, but it’s definitely worth giving it a try.

Assistance Programs and Online Sources

There are many local and state programs available to help addicts in recovery get on their feet financially. For example, in Pennsylvania, there is a Vocational Rehabilitation program that offers job assistance to those in recovery. Opting for a program that works with employers that are aware of your condition will help relieve the anxiety of talking about it.

Other great online sources for getting a job after rehab include:

Be Resourceful

We live in a world full of opportunity where those who persevere, prevail. A “no” doesn’t mean much, there is always another opportunity and you must keep trying. 

Don’t be afraid to tap into your network, not only your professional network but also your friends and family. Make sure you bring up your situation when you attend 12-step meetings, there can always be someone who may know of an opportunity, and who better understands your situation than a fellow recovery addict.

Prioritize Your Recovery

Being a bartender is not the best choice for an alcoholic in recovery, not that it can’t be done, but surely there are also other ways. Maybe in a different role, your new coworkers could be heavy drinkers or even users and that may place pressure on you, if that’s the case seek to speak to a specialist and re-think your options. 

Getting a job after rehab shouldn’t interfere with your recovery. Whatever comes your way, make sure it doesn’t become more important than your recovery or place it at risk. Losing your progress with relapse can bring you back to step one and end up costing you the job. 

Begin Your Journey with Elysium Healthcare

Elysium Healthcare is a top-rated luxury provider of drug and alcohol rehabs. We provide rehab facilities that include both inpatient and outpatient treatment. No matter which treatment option is best for you, we have a rehab that can help.

Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our aftercare options.

Does Insurance Cover Detox Programs?

Does Insurance Cover Detox Programs

Detox programs are designed to help addicts get over the difficulties of substance dependence by detoxifying the body from drugs and alcohol.

There is a cultural misconception about the pricing of detox and recovery being too high and unaffordable. This mystification has deterred many addicts from seeking the help they need and getting sober. In reality, the costs for detox vary greatly depending on the rehab center, and while some luxurious options may foot a larger bill, there is always the option to secure insurance to pay for the treatment.

Does Health Insurance Cover Detox?

No one should be left out of medical treatment due to their inability to pay for it, particularly addicts who may have fallen out of financial luck due to their disease. So does health insurance cover detox? The short answer is yes, it does.

Gratefully, for those wanting to get better, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted into law in 2010. The act lists addiction services as an essential coverage category for insurance. That means addiction rehabilitation now falls under the same umbrella as other medical and surgical treatments because it’s also considered a medical treatment, and your insurance can pay for it, allowing addicts in recovery to commence their new lives without excessive financial burdens caused by the recovery process.

“But I don’t have insurance, I can’t get help” – Not true.

The Affordable Care Act has you covered on that as well. The act covers pre-existing conditions, which means you can opt for insurance regardless of where you may be in your addiction or recovery process. Opting for this solution may take longer, but it’s possible nonetheless. 

As with all insurance, not all plans are created equal. Premium plans may cover the treatment fully and even extend to luxury rehabs while basic plans may leave part of the bill to be financed by the patient. Basic insurance may be upgraded to a premium plan under the Affordable Care Act.

How many times does health insurance cover detox? Due to the pre-existing condition clause, one may re-apply for detox if needed.

What Other Addiction Treatments Does Insurance Cover?

All marketplace plans cover mental health and substance abuse services. They must include:

  • Behavioral health treatments such as counseling and psychotherapy
  • Mental and behavioral health inpatient services
  • Substance abuse treatment such as detox and outpatient care

The best way to find out what percent of treatment is covered by your insurance is by contacting your insurance provider and asking for it, or seeking guidance from a rehab facility finance team.

Most providers won’t advertise their substance abuse coverage which can make it confusing for the patient to understand if he or she can get coverage. The following companies are known to be health insurance that covers rehab:

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Humana
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Vela Point
  • Beacon Health
  • United Healthcare
  • Multiplan
  • Geha
  • Cigna
  • CoreSource
  • Gilsbar
  • Anthem
  • Value options

Find Out if You Are Covered

Elysium Healthcare is a top-rated luxury provider of drug and alcohol rehabs. We provide rehab facilities that include both inpatient and outpatient treatment. No matter which treatment option is best for you, we have a rehab that can help.

Our professional team of admissions has extensive experience dealing with insurance coverage for detox programs. Finances should not shy you away from seeking the help you or your loved ones need to get better

Contact Elysium today and speak to one of our admission professionals to find out more about how your insurance can cover detox.

Does Insurance Cover Detox Programs?

Detox programs are designed to help addicts get over the difficulties of substance dependence by detoxifying the body from drugs and alcohol.

There is a cultural misconception about the pricing of detox and recovery being too high and unaffordable. This mystification has deterred many addicts from seeking the help they need and getting sober. In reality, the costs for detox vary greatly depending on the rehab center, and while some luxurious options may foot a larger bill, there is always the option to secure insurance to pay for the treatment.

Does health insurance cover detox?

No one should be left out of medical treatment due to their inability to pay for it, particularly addicts who may have fallen out of financial luck due to their disease. So does health insurance cover detox? The short answer is yes, it does.

Gratefully, for those wanting to get better, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted into law in 2010. The act lists addiction services as an essential coverage category for insurance. That means addiction rehabilitation now falls under the same umbrella as other medical and surgical treatments because it’s also considered a medical treatment, and your insurance can pay for it, allowing addicts in recovery to commence their new lives without excessive financial burdens caused by the recovery process.

“But I don’t have insurance, I can’t get help” – Not true.

The Affordable Care Act has you covered on that as well. The act covers pre-existing conditions, which means you can opt for insurance regardless of where you may be in your addiction or recovery process. Opting for this solution may take longer, but it’s possible nonetheless.

As with all insurance, not all plans are created equal. Premium plans may cover the treatment fully and even extend to luxury rehabs while basic plans may leave part of the bill to be financed by the patient. Basic insurance may be upgraded to a premium plan under the Affordable Care Act.

How many times does health insurance cover detox? Due to the pre-existing condition clause, one may re-apply for detox if needed.

What other addiction treatments does insurance cover?

All marketplace plans cover mental health and substance abuse services. They must include:

Behavioral health treatments such as counseling and psychotherapy
Mental and behavioral health inpatient services
Substance abuse treatment such as detox and outpatient care

The best way to find out what percent of treatment is covered by your insurance is by contacting your insurance provider and asking for it, or seeking guidance from a rehab facility finance team.

Most providers won’t advertise their substance abuse coverage which can make it confusing for the patient to understand if he or she can get coverage. The following companies are known to be health insurance that covers rehab:

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Humana
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Vela Point
  • Beacon Health
  • United Healthcare
  • Multiplan
  • Geha
  • Cigna
  • CoreSource
  • Gilsbar
  • Anthem
  • Value options

Find out if you are covered

Elysium Healthcare is a top-rated luxury provider of drug and alcohol rehabs. We provide rehab facilities that include both inpatient and outpatient treatment. No matter which treatment option is best for you, we have a rehab that can help.

Our professional team of admissions has extensive experience dealing with insurance coverage for detox programs. Finances should not shy you away from seeking the help you or your loved ones need to get better

Contact Elysium today and speak to one of our admission professionals to find out more about how your insurance can cover detox.

How to Get a Job After Rehab Ends

How to Get a Job After Rehab Ends

Leaving rehab is the beginning of a life-long journey into recovery. At first, it can be challenging for an addict to begin to live a normal life, particularly if they have been off the rails for a long time. Re-entering the workforce or getting a job after rehab can present its own set of challenges.

For example: Going back to an old job could trigger the addict’s old habits, or it could become a source of shame due to previous addictive behaviors in the workplace. On the other hand, not being employed and having a gap on the CV could make it difficult to land at the top of the stack.

The good news is that everything is much easier when you are sober, getting over an addiction is an impressive accomplishment that shouldn’t be understated – The recommendations in this article can help addicts get their careers back on track.

Flipping the Script

OK. This one may not be for everybody, but hear me out – most people will naturally want to hide the details about their recovery from potential employers, and this is absolutely FINE. However, there is a great deal of power behind your story and what you just went through that can be used in your favor.

It’s true that some employers will be judgmental and discriminatory, but there will also be a large number of them that will see your recovery as something positive.

Why?

Strength: Recovery is not a weakness, it’s a strength. Most people are barely able to maintain control over their diet, let alone stop drinking forever. The discipline and strength of an addict in recovery is unmatched. Those are soft skills that are in high demand in the business world, get your bragging rights in order because you deserve them.

Courage: Courage is also a high-demand soft skill in the business world. Having the courage to discuss your recovery can demonstrate that you can be a good leader and tackle situations in a level-headed way.

Honesty: Most will assume that addicts in recovery would keep their condition a secret, openly speaking about it shows that you are an honest person that can be trusted. Business is based on trust and honest employees are highly sought after.

Choosing the high route is a personal choice, each person must use their best judgment to understand what’s best for the situation, but it’s definitely worth giving it a try.

Assistance Programs and Online Sources

There are many local and state programs available to help addicts in recovery get on their feet financially. For example, in Pennsylvania, there is a Vocational Rehabilitation program that offers job assistance to those in recovery. Opting for a program that works with employers that are aware of your condition will help relieve the anxiety of talking about it.

Other great online sources for getting a job after rehab include:

  • The Department of Labor
  • The National Skills Coalition
  • The Salvation Army
  • National H.I.R.E. Network
  • Linkedin
  • Indeed

Be Resourceful

We live in a world full of opportunity where those who persevere, prevail. A “no” doesn’t mean much, there is always another opportunity and you must keep trying.

Don’t be afraid to tap into your network, not only your professional network but also your friends and family. Make sure you bring up your situation when you attend 12-step meetings, there can always be someone who may know of an opportunity, and who better understands your situation than a fellow recovery addict.

Prioritize Your Recovery

Being a bartender is not the best choice for an alcoholic in recovery, not that it can’t be done, but surely there are also other ways. Maybe in a different role, your new coworkers could be heavy drinkers or even users and that may place pressure on you, if that’s the case seek to speak to a specialist and re-think your options.

Getting a job after rehab shouldn’t interfere with your recovery. Whatever comes your way, make sure it doesn’t become more important than your recovery or place it at risk. Losing your progress with relapse can bring you back to step one and end up costing you the job.

Begin Your Journey With Elysium Healthcare

Elysium Healthcare is a top-rated luxury provider of drug and alcohol rehabs. We provide rehab facilities that include both inpatient and outpatient treatment. No matter which treatment option is best for you, we have a rehab that can help.

Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our aftercare options.

What Does Opioid Use Look Like?

What Does Opioid Use Look Like

Opioids are a group of synthetic drugs that are related to opium, they are used as painkillers and prescribed to patients as needed. Similar to their closely related cousins, opioids can be addictive and prompt abuse. Opioid addiction is considered an epidemic in America and a serious social problem, it has claimed the lives of over 16,000 people in 2020, making up around 16% of all drug-related drugs since 1999, that year alone.

Because opioids are prescribed to patients from all walks of life, it’s very possible that even those who are not users of illegal drugs could fall victim to its claws, developing dependency and the need for rehab.

Understanding what are the signs of opioid use can help us gauge if someone we care for who is using the medication could be at risk of addiction. 

What Does Opioid Use Look Like?

Figuring out if someone is abusing opioids is not as straightforward as it would be with other drugs, particularly if the patient is taking it as a prescription. Those using opioids may be suffering from pain because of a surgery or disease, this causes an inherent moral conflict which makes it difficult for families to assess their condition and provide them with the support they need.

On the other hand, users may become addicted to opioids and seek to continue using them after their medication is no longer needed. Assessing this case may be easier as the signs and symptoms of opioid use will be noticeable.

So what are the signs of opioid use then?

When looking out for signs and symptoms two categories stand out; behaviors and physical symptoms.

Behaviors

People who are using opioids will exhibit several behaviors that can be noticed by those around them, they include:

  • Craving more opioids than prescribed by a doctor
  • Lying about being their pain to take more medication
  • Taking them “Just in case” or buying extra as a “backup”
  • Having mood swing which includes slashing out negatively and hostilities
  • Difficulty sleeping or sleeping for too long
  • “Losing” medication
  • Medication runs out too quick
  • Abnormal fatigue

Physical

Behaviors are not the only way to notice if someone we love may be abusing opioids, there are many physical signs and symptoms that could point to a problem. They include:

  • Pinpointed pupils
  • Slurred speech
  • Constantly appearing spaced-out or drowsy
  • Slower movements
  • Low blood pressure
  • Low body temperature
  • Feeling euphoric
  • Shows withdrawal symptoms

The Moral Dilemma

Family and friends can be enablers, we may feel compelled to assist our loved ones in getting more prescriptions for them or letting them go along with their addiction, it can be very difficult, particularly when there is an underlying medical issue; however, it does more harm than good and those closest to the addict must find the courage to seek help so they may get the support they need. 

You are better prepared to help now that you understand what are the signs of opioid use. Consider changes you may notice in their prescription use and make sure to always consult with a doctor before making any changes to how they take the medication.

What to Do If Signs of Opioid Use Are Present

If a loved one is showing signs of addiction you must not waste time, it’s important to contact an addiction expert as soon as possible to discuss the options available for the addict. An early catch may certainly alleviate the situation.

Elysium Healthcare is an expert in addiction treatments and will be able to assist you every step of the way.

Contact Elysium today, to get your loved ones the help they need.

What is the Difference Between Inpatient and Outpatient Drug Rehab?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs belong to one of two types of treatment: inpatient rehab or outpatient rehab. Although the goal of both rehab rehabs is long-term recovery, the specifics, benefits, and drawbacks of the programs differ. As such, one program may be better suited to your needs than the other. 

It’s important to understand the difference between inpatient and outpatient rehab. By understanding the differences between these rehab options, you can select a treatment program that is right for you and your needs.

Inpatient vs Outpatient Rehab

At the heart of both options, inpatient rehab and outpatient rehab are the same. They focus on your recovery to help you achieve long-lasting sobriety. Although the end goal is the same, some specifics about the rehabs differ. Here is a look at inpatient vs outpatient drug rehab:

Inpatient Rehab 

Inpatient rehab is considered the most comprehensive form of addiction treatment. It involves staying at a clinic for an extended amount of time 24/7. This around-the-clock approach to treatment provides you with constant access to medical help and emotional support.

Inpatient rehab is most often selected whenever individuals are first beginning their sobriety journey. Because inpatient care involves staying at a facility full time, it provides the structure and support you need to begin your journey and create a firm foundation.

Outpatient Rehab 

Outpatient rehab is considered a comprehensive approach to addiction treatment, but you do not stay at a facility full time. Instead, you will be able to leave the facility for different reasons, depending on which treatment you select. 

For example, you might be able to sleep at home but spend your days at the facility, or you might be able to have a part-time job or be a part-time student. At the same time, you will still receive comprehensive treatment to help you achieve long-term sobriety.

Often, outpatient rehab is an option for individuals with mild cases of substance use disorder. It is frequently an option for individuals who have recently finished inpatient rehab and want to slowly transition back to their everyday life.

Inpatient vs Outpatient Drug Rehab: Which One Is Right for Me? 

Deciding whether you should start your treatment with inpatient or outpatient rehab is a serious task. You want to select a program that is right for your needs and addictions. As such, you will want to choose between inpatient versus outpatient drug rehab by looking at your unique case.

Inpatient treatment will likely be best for you if you have never received substance use disorder treatment before or you have a severe case of addiction. The inpatient treatment will provide you with extensive support, structure, and care so that you can get through the first part of your journey.

In contrast, outpatient treatment may be right for you if you do not have a severe case, or you have already undergone detox and the beginning stages of recovery. The outpatient treatment will continue providing you the treatment you need while also allowing you a bit more freedom in your outside life.

Before making any final decisions, make sure to talk to doctors and rehab representatives to get some advice about which treatment opportunity is right for you. Getting medical advice will further clarify the confusion about inpatient vs outpatient drug rehab. 

Begin Your Journey with Elysium Healthcare 

Elysium Healthcare is a top-rated luxury provider of drug and alcohol rehabs. We provide rehab facilities that include both inpatient and outpatient treatment. No matter which treatment option is best for you, we have a rehab that can help. Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our inpatient and outpatient treatment options.

Why Choose a Luxury Drug and Alcohol Center?

Why Choose a Luxury Drug and Alcohol Center?

If you or someone you love suffers from a substance use disorder, it’s time to begin looking for treatment opportunities. Today, there are a variety of treatment facilities and rehabs. One of the more popular options is luxury drug rehab centers.

Luxury drug and alcohol rehab centers are designed to add a touch of luxury to the rehab experience. Because of these luxurious amenities, you can fully relax and heal while focusing on your recovery and health. That being said, it’s important to understand the reasons why you should choose a luxury drug and alcohol center to ensure you make the right decision for your needs.

6 Reasons to Choose Luxury Drug and Alcohol Rehab Centers 

There are many reasons why you should choose a luxury drug and alcohol center, but six reasons stand out from the rest:

Most Advanced Treatments 

Luxury rehab facilities are equipped with the most advanced treatment opportunities. Their treatment approach involves the most up-to-date techniques that are backed by science. These advanced medical treatments ensure you have access to the top treatments the medical community has access to.

Top Medical Care 

Not only do luxury facilities offer the most advanced treatment, but they offer top medical care. this medical care is backed by evidence, but it is administered with a human touch. Because of this more empathetic approach to the advanced treatments, you have a relaxing and welcoming environment that will make you feel more at ease during the process.

On top of the human touch, luxury facilities offer treatment and medical care in a customized way. This customized approach allows for the advanced treatments to be administered in a way that is relevant and helpful to each individual patient.

Holistic Approaches

In addition to offering top treatments that are backed in science, luxury facilities don’t just focus on your physical well-being. Instead, luxury facilities take a holistic approach to health and well-being. This holistic approach will allow you to heal your mind, body, and soul while receiving the addiction treatment you need.

Not many people realize how important holistic approaches are in addiction treatment. Whenever someone faces addiction, many facets of their life collapse, including their physical health, mental health, hobbies, and relationships. By taking a holistic approach to treatment, individuals can learn how to rebuild multiple areas of their life so they can build a holistic life that they love in and out of treatment. 

Best Medical Professionals in the Industry 

Even if a facility has advanced treatment, great medical care, and holistic approaches, the facility won’t do much good if its professionals are subpar. Whenever you select a luxury facility, you don’t have to worry about dealing with less than impressive doctors and staff. Luxury rehab facilities offer best-in-class medical professionals to ensure all treatments are administered properly and empathetically. 

Luxurious Amenities 

The big thing that separates a luxury facility from a regular rehab is its luxurious amenities. Luxury facilities include hotel-like rooms, spa-like environments, and welcoming grounds. These luxurious amenities create a resort atmosphere that allows you to focus fully on your healing.

Beautiful Scenery 

In addition to luxurious amenities, most luxury rehabs also are surrounded by beautiful scenery. This beautiful scenery allows you to get in touch with nature in further relax so that you can reach your recovery goals.

Get Help with Elysium Healthcare’s Luxury Drug Rehab Facilities 

Elysium Healthcare provides a network of luxury drug and alcohol centers. Our centers are top-rated and provide a resort-like environment so that you can heal in a relaxing environment. If you are interested in receiving treatment at one of our luxury facilities, contact Elysium Healthcare today.

What are Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms?

heroin withdrawal

Heroin is a highly addictive substance. Just a few hours after the last use, many users are eager to get their next hit. After prolonged use, users develop a tolerance to the substance and need more of it in order to feel the same high as before and even to function throughout their everyday life.

If the addict stops using heroin abruptly, they will go into withdrawal. Heroin withdrawal symptoms are severe and uncomfortable. They are painful enough that many people avoid withdrawal at all costs, and they can be dangerous. 

What exactly are the withdrawal symptoms of heroin? Read on to find out. This article will further help you understand the symptoms of withdrawal from heroin, what to expect during the process, and how treatment facilities can help. 

Understanding Heroin Withdrawal 

Before we dive into the heroin withdrawal symptoms, let’s talk about why heroin withdrawal occurs in the first place. Heroin is an addictive substance that impacts your brain chemistry. Heroin works by essentially blocking your brain from receiving pain messages. As a result, heroin is a sedative that can lessen feelings of pain, anxiety, and depression.

As you continue to use heroin, the substance alters your brain chemistry. Whenever this occurs, your tolerance increases, as does dependence on the substance. Once you are dependent on the substance, your body requires heroin to function as normal.

If an addict stops using heroin abruptly after prolonged use, their brain chemistry goes haywire in a sense. This change in chemistry results in a number of painful symptoms. As the body is getting rid of the last traces of heroin, these symptoms will peak until they eventually subside.

Heroin withdrawal normally lasts for about one week after the last dose. Symptoms will first appear 6 to 12 hours after the last dose and peak one to three days after. Symptoms normally subside after about a week, but symptoms may remain 10 days after the last use.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms 

Heroin withdrawal symptoms can range from moderate to severe. Where you are at in the withdrawal process, how long you have been using, and how much heroin is in your system will impact the severity of the withdrawal process. The most common heroin withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Sweats
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle spasms
  • Increased blood pressure 
  • Increased heart rate
  • Intense cravings 
  • Agitation
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Tremors
  • Upset stomach
  • Vomiting
  • Watery eyes
  • Muscle aches
  • Depression
  • Chills

The most severe of these symptoms normally begin one day to three days after the individual’s last use. These symptoms are the most painful and dangerous.

Dangers of Withdrawing from Heroin Alone

Withdrawing from heroin is painful, uncomfortable, and sometimes dangerous. You never want to withdraw from heroin by yourself. If you withdraw by yourself, your detox will be painful and dangerous. In severe cases, withdrawing alone can lead to seizures, stroke, coma, and even death.

For most users, withdrawing alone is also ineffective. Due to the extreme symptoms of withdrawal, most individuals do not make it through the detox process and relapse instead.

Instead of detoxing by yourself, withdraw from heroin safely through medical detox. Medical detox allows you to detox from heroin safely. A medical team will be by your side to monitor vitals and make the process as comfortable as possible through management techniques

Withdrawal Safely with Elysium Healthcare 

Elysium Healthcare is a comprehensive healthcare network that can connect you with a number of rehab facilities. So that your detox is as safe and comfortable as possible, contact Elysium Healthcare today. Our team can help you find a rehab facility where you can safely detox from heroin.

What Are Physical Symptoms of Chronic Alcohol Abuse?

What Are Physical Symptoms of Chronic Alcohol Abuse?

Chronic alcohol abuse plagues the body in a number of ways. Substance use disorder, including alcohol use disorder, includes physical, psychological, and behavioral symptoms. These symptoms disrupt a person’s quality of life and can impact their relationship with the ones around them.

Understanding the physical symptoms of chronic alcohol abuse provides you with some knowledge about the issue. If you see these symptoms in yourself or someone you love, it may be time to seek addiction treatment.

Scroll down to learn more about the physical symptoms of chronic alcohol abuse and how to go about finding treatment.

Understanding the Physical Symptoms of Alcohol Abuse 

As mentioned above, substance use disorders typically have three categories of symptoms: physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, and behavioral symptoms. Physical symptoms are the symptoms that directly impact a person’s physical health and body. In contrast, psychological symptoms impact a person’s mental health, while behavioral symptoms impact a person’s behaviors.

Although the physical symptoms of alcohol abuse have a close relationship with the psychological and behavioral symptoms, it’s important that individuals who suffer from substance abuse take the physical symptoms seriously since they can be lifelong.

Most Common Physical Symptoms of Chronic Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholism negatively impacts the body in many ways. The severity of the addiction largely impacts how severe these symptoms are. The signs and symptoms of long-term alcoholism change based on how long they have been using and if they are continuing to use.

As such, it’s important to look at warning signs, long-term physical symptoms, and withdrawal symptoms when looking at the physical symptoms of chronic alcohol abuse. All three categories give you a complete picture of the physical symptoms associated with alcohol abuse. 

Here is a look at each one of those categories and their respective symptoms.

Warning Signs of Alcoholism 

If you are not sure if a loved one suffers from alcoholism, there are some physical warning signs to look out for. Some of these warning signs include:

  • Sudden changes in weight 
  • Increased tolerance 
  • Blackouts 
  • Memory loss 
  • Declining health 
  • Alcohol poisoning 

Keep in mind that these are not the only warning signs to be aware of. Research behavioral and psychological symptoms and warning signs as well.

Long-Term Physical Symptoms of Chronic Alcohol Abuse 

It’s not enough to just know the warning signs. You also have to know the long-term physical symptoms of chronic alcohol abuse. These are the symptoms that arise once a person has been a chronic drinker for years. Some long-term symptoms include:

  • Liver diseases 
  • Cancer
  • Heart disease 
  • High blood pressure 
  • Stroke 
  • Alcohol poisoning 

Physical Symptoms When Withdrawing from Alcohol 

A person who suffers from alcohol use disorder likely has a high tolerance to alcohol. If they stop drinking, their body will go into withdrawal. The physical withdrawal symptoms when stopping alcohol include:

  • Irritability 
  • Depression 
  • Nausea 
  • Depression 
  • Restlessness 
  • Trouble sleeping 
  • Sweating
  • Tremors 

What to Do If You or a Loved One Shows Physical Symptoms of Chronic Alcohol Abuse

If you or a loved one shows any of the physical symptoms of chronic alcohol abuse above, it’s important to act quickly. The sooner you can get into treatment, the sooner your health can improve. Given that the physical symptoms of chronic alcohol use can be lifelong, you want to stop drinking as soon as possible.

Begin Your New Life with Elysium Healthcare 

Elysium Healthcare provides luxury addiction treatment facilities in California. All of our facilities are top-rated and provide comprehensive care. With the help of Elysium Healthcare on your side, you can find a treatment facility that can help you begin your new life. Contact Elysium Healthcare today to learn more about our treatment options.

What is Dual Diagnosis Treatment?

What is Dual Diagnosis Treatment?

Many individuals who suffer from alcohol or drug addiction also suffer from a co-occurring mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD. This phenomenon is called a dual diagnosis. For individuals who suffer from substance use disorder and a co-occurring mental illness, dual diagnosis treatment is essential.

What is dual diagnosis treatment?

What Is Dual Diagnosis: Explained 

Dual diagnosis occurs whenever an individual suffers from both a mental disorder and a drug or alcohol problem. Dual diagnosis treatment involves treating the co-occurring illnesses alongside one another to help the person heal from all fronts. The goal of this treatment is holistic recovery and care. 

What Illnesses Often Co-Occur Alongside Addiction? 

Individuals who suffer from drug and alcohol addiction are often diagnosed with a co-occurring disorder. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 9.2 million adults have a co-occurring disorder in the United States. Some of these co-occurring disorders can include:

  • Anxiety 
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 
  • Bipolar disorder 
  • Conduct disorders 
  • Major depressive disorder 
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder 
  • Schizophrenia 

This is not a comprehensive list of illnesses that may occur alongside addiction, but they are the most common.

The Relationship Between Mental Disorders and Substance Use Disorders

The fact that over 9 million adults suffer from a dual diagnosis may come as a shock to you, but it does not come as a shock to medical professionals. There is a close relationship between mental disorders and substance use disorders.

Individuals who suffer from mental disorders may look to soothe their mental turmoil with substances, resulting in a substance use disorder that requires treatment. Conversely, a substance use disorder may escalate into a mental disorder with continual use and the stress that comes with it.

Additionally, there are common risk factors that contribute to both substance use disorders and mental disorders. For example, stress, trauma, and genetics all impact a person’s susceptibility to both substance use disorders and mental disorders.

How Is Dual Diagnosis Treatment Different From Other Treatments? 

Dual diagnosis treatment builds upon regular addiction treatment, but it is designed specifically for the individual. It provides the individual with medical treatment for all medical diagnoses. As such, the individual will receive medical intervention for the addiction and the co-occurring mental illness.

Dual diagnosis treatment normally begins whenever an individual fills out an intake form at a rehab facility. The intake process involves numerous questions to fully understand the person’s physical and mental state.

From there, the team will work to create a treatment plan specifically for that individual. The treatment begins with a detox. It then continues with behavioral therapies, social support, and sometimes medicines. This approach to a dual diagnosis results in holistic care that warrants optimal success.

Treatment for dual diagnosis typically extends after the initial rehab treatment. Individuals who suffer from a mental disorder will normally begin seeing a doctor regularly to ensure their mental health is maintained. They should also continue therapy or group sessions to target their addiction.

Contact Elysium Healthcare for Help 

Dual diagnosis occurs frequently among individuals who suffer from addiction. If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction and also suffers from a co-occurring illness, dual diagnosis treatment will likely be the most effective option for recovery.

Elysium Healthcare provides comprehensive recovery options for individuals who receive a dual diagnosis. Our programs are designed to help individuals from the inside out. As such, our programs are specialized based on the individual. We even provide a number of facilities to ensure you find a program that is right for your needs and preferences.

To learn more about Elysium Healthcare’s offerings, get in touch with us today.